Triana Bridge, Seville

Triana Bridge, Seville

At the stroke of midnight on December 31st 1999 I was standing in Plaza Nueva in the centre of the Andalucían city of Seville with thousands of other people, to welcome in the new millennium.  So, it was with some nostalgia that I returned for a few days recently, to be reminded of the delights that Seville has to offer – both old and new.  I’ll be letting you know all about that in another post coming up soon, but for now, I want to show you the Isabel II bridge, more popularly known as Puente de Triana.

Until 1852, the only way across the Guadalquivir River was by using a makeshift bridge, originally formed in 1171 by chaining 13 boats together between the river banks. In 1847, French engineers Fernando Bernadet and Gustavo Steinacher began work on the Isabel II bridge, linking the Gypsy neighbourhood of Triana with the city centre of Seville.

It’s a pleasant stroll across Triana bridge which has become known for its love-locks, a custom by which padlocks are fixed to a gate, fence or bridge by sweethearts as a symbol of their eternal love.  Because of the numbers involved, this practice has now become frowned upon, and the locks are periodically removed.

As you will gather, I took the above photo whilst enjoying an evening cruise along the Rio Guadalquivir.  I love the way the lights from the bridge are reflected in the gently flowing water.

I also want to take this opportunity to announce the winner of my recent draw to win 6 handwritten postcards from Spain is …… Sylvia of Another Day in Paradise!  

CONGRATULATIONS – I WILL BE SENDING YOUR FIRST POSTCARD VERY SOON 🙂

Related posts:

Black & White Photo Challenge: Bridges

Weekly Photo Challenge: Nostalgic

Travel Theme: Motion

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Riddle Me This: The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing Statues

El Vendimiador statue in Plaza Almijara, Competa, Spain

I took this photograph of  the charming El Vendimiador several years ago when it was situated in the main square, Plaza Almijara in the village of Cómpeta.

The statue commemorates centuries of wine-making in the area and shows the grape-picker standing in his sandals on a dry-stone wall.  On his head he carries a basket of freshly-picked grapes and by his side, his young daughter helps with the harvest.  

Despite being sited in the main square, next to the 500 year old Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de la Asunción village church only eight years ago, the statue disappeared a few years later.  I suppose this was to make more room for vehicles to turn around in the tiny square, already half full of tables, chairs and sunshades from the nearby cafes and restaurants.

No-one seemed to know what had happened to the statue and some even suggested it had been damaged during the move.

Fortunately El Vendimiador re-appeared earlier this year at the new Mirador in Competa’s Plaza Vendimia (where he really should have been all along), except now he stands alone, without his daughter.  

Curiouser and curiouser …….!

El Vendimiador statue in Plaza Almijara, Competa, Spain (from the church tower)

Looking down on El Vendimiador from the Church tower

This post is my response to this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge: Companionable and to Ailsa’s Travel Theme: Sculpture

You might also enjoy:

Competa´s Noche del vino: Night of wine

The heart of Cómpeta: El Paseo de las Tradiciones

The Day of the Dead: A Celebration of Life

CBBH Photo Challenge: SAME SUBJECT, DIFFERENT TIME

“It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.”

        Henry David Thoreau

Mist across nearby hills

Among the Impressionist artist Claude Monet’s most notable work is a series of 25 canvases called Haystacks.  The primary subjects of all of the paintings in the series are stacks of hay in a field, after the harvest season.   Monet  began painting the Haystacks at the end of the summer of 1890 and continued through to the following spring.  The series is well known for the use of repetition to show differences in perception of light across various times of day, seasons, and types of weather.

And, we can do just the same thing with photography. 

Returning to a place at a different time of day, in varying weather conditions, during another season or even many years later can result in vastly different photographic images, due to the changing conditions.

Irina Werning has captured some fascinating images at her Back to the Future project – why not take a look?  I’m sure you will have a laugh at some of them!

For this month’s CBBH Photo Challenge I want you to show me at least two photos taken of the same subject (slightly different angles are allowed, but it has to be obviously the same subject matter) taken at different times.

Will it be a person, changing over time?  Trees and flowers growing from newly planted to almost taking over your garden, or places you have travelled to that have changed dramatically since a previous visit?  GO AHEAD, SURPRISE ME!

Want to see my interpretation? 

Sunshine across nearby hills

Here is a view of the hills on one side of where I live.  As you can see, in this photo it’s a bright sunny day.

Mist across nearby hills

This is the same view in an evening when the mist has rolled up the valley from the Mediterranean Sea.  I love it when this happens as all I can see is cloud swirling below my castle in the sky!

Sunset over nearby hills

….and here is a shot of the spectacular sunsets we are blessed with, over the same hillside.

 

I first visited and photographed the Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand, a few days before it was destroyed by the devastating earthquake on 22nd February 2011 (photo on right). When I returned to New Zealand at the beginning of 2013, I was able to take the photo on the left, as Cathedral Square was open for a few days over the Christmas and New Year period when the workmen took their holidays.

Roman bridge and Mezquita, Cordoba, Spain

One of my favourite cities in Andalucía is Córdoba and here it is in all it’s glory with the Mezquita taking centre stage, as viewed from the other side of the city’s Roman bridge.

Roman bridge and Mezquita, Cordoba, Spain at night

And here’s the same view at night. Lovely isn’t it?

Click on any of the smaller images to view a slideshow

In this series of photos, the subject is the aircraft wing of the Ryanair flight I was on, coming into land at Dublin airport in Ireland.  As you can see, even though the subject remains the same, the background has changed considerably and we were greeted by the most amazing sunrays peeping through the clouds.

 

This month’s CBBH Featured Blogs:

** Lady of the Cakes lives in central Spain, in the beautiful city of Toledo and offers “vignettes from a multi-lingual, cake-eating freelance existence”.  In a recent post, Simone shows us around some of Toledo’s Palacial Patios which are accessible once a year, and for one week only (during the Corpus Christi celebrations), when a number of private houses open their patios (inner courtyards) to the general public.   Of course, this is Don Quixote country, so you might enjoy reading The Weekly Don Quixote Series.  Simone always holds my interest with her posts, shares some fantastic photos and often has me in stitches at some of the antics she gets up to.  I’d love you to pop along and say HOLA! 

** Lynsey at La Rosilla – Lifestyle and Food like me, is a British expat who moved to the Axarquía region of southern Spain about eight years ago.   A passionate home cook, and self-confessed “cook book whore”, Lyndsey celebrated World Sherry Day last Sunday with the opening day of this season’s Supper Club.  This multi-talented and super-busy lady not only offers cooking classes to visitors, but also finds the time to deliver ready-prepared meals for special occasions.  Check out Lynsey’s delicious delivery delights for a nearby villager on Mother’s Day, recently.    Mmmm …. think I might have to book into La Rosilla for a Supper Club celebration soon!

Conejo Blanco BLOG HOP Photo Challenge

So that´s the CBBH Photo Challenge for JUNE, everyone!

Remember, all you have to do is post your entry by the end of the month, tag your entry ‘CBBH Photo Challenge’,  link back to this blog and, most importantlydon´t forget to add links to any two blogs that you´ve commented on during the past month, so that we can all HOP OVER and have a look.  Make sure you FOLLOW THIS BLOG so you don´t miss next month´s exciting challenge!

For more information on how the CBBH Photo Challenge works click here.

I hope everyone taking part enjoys the exposure the CBBH Photo Challenge offers to featured blogs and, who knows, you may end up finding a new favourite!  I´m looking forward to seeing your interpretations.

[CBBH logo Image credit: (cc) Mostly Dans]

Sayalonga: The narrowest street in the Axarquía

Callejon de la Alcuza, Sayalonga, Spain

As my contribution to this week’s Travel Theme: PathwaysI’d like to show you Callejon de la Alcuza in the white village of Sayalonga in southern Spain.

With a width of only 56 cms at one end, this is officially the narrowest street in the Axarquía region.

As you might imagine, there’s not much of a traffic problem here!

Callejon de la Alcuza, Sayalonga, Spain

 

Other Photo Challenges you might enjoy:

CBBH Photo Challenge: KNOBS AND KNOCKERS

WordPress Photo Challenge: THANKFUL

Travel Theme: MULTIPLES

CBBH Photo Challenge: KNOBS AND KNOCKERS

Forget bells and intercoms – this month’s CBBH Photo Challenge is all about decorative door furniture, to make an entrance look perfect.

Of course, the purpose of a door knocker is to let the householder know there is someone at the door, but at some point in history they took on shape and symbolic meaning. I’ve seen protective dogs and lions, honorary wreaths, severed hands, mythological references to Medusa and Cleopatra, as well as elegant and ornate displays of wealth in polished brass.

There are some really interesting knobs and knockers out there, just waiting to be discovered and photographed.  CAN’T WAIT TO SEE YOURS!

SPOILER: SCROLL DOWN FOR DETAILS OF HOW TO GET MY $25 THANK YOU GIFT – FOR EACH ONE OF YOU!

Door knocker, Toledo, Spain

I photographed this beauty in the Spanish city of Toledo, at the end of last summer.  Isn’t it amazing?!

Hand of Fatima door knocker, Spain

Used frequently as door knockers, another vestige of the Moorish occupation of the Iberian Peninsula is the Hand of Fatima. Fatima Zahra was the daughter of the Prophet Mohammed, and the hand door knockers are talismans used to ward off the evil eye, and offer protection to the household.

Door knob in Granada, Spain

Bread hanging from a doorknob in Torrox, Spain

This may not be a photo of a fancy door knob, but it is a significant one.  Around many of the little villages in Andalucía there is often a morning bread delivery.  The little van from the panaderia winds its way around the steep streets, leaving a loaf of bread tied to the doors of many of the houses, in much the same way that the milkman used to make his early morning deliveries to make sure you had your daily pint of milk, back in the UK.  Does that still happen I wonder?   🙂

Door knocker, Cómpeta, Spain

toledo October 2012 226

So, there you have them – some grand knockers on plain doors, some quite plain knobs and knockers on grand doors.

This month’s CBBH Featured Blogs:

** The Legion of Door Whores has a collaboration of contributors who post doors of many descriptions they have photographed.  Considering the theme of this month’s challenge,  l was delighted to find a particularly splendid pair of door knobs in Girona, Spain as well as these fine brass knobs in Buenos Airesalong with a host of other doors in all shapes, sizes and condition.  If you are a bit of a Door Whore yourself, you will be amazed at some of the beautiful photographs posted onto this blog.

** Kiva is a non-profit organization close to my own heart, with a mission to connect people through lending, to alleviate poverty.  Leveraging the internet and a worldwide network of microfinance institutions, Kiva lets individuals lend as little as $25 to help create opportunity around the world. Learn more about how it works.

Kiva gives you the chance to make small loans to borrowers working to start businesses and improve their lives. I’m already a Kiva lender and as a way of saying thank you for your support of my blog, I WOULD LIKE TO OFFER YOU A $25 FREE TRIAL. 

To redeem your Free Trial all you have to do is CLICK THIS LINK and choose who to lend your money to – BUT HURRY – THERE IS A LIMITED NUMBER OF FREE TRIALS.  IT WON’T COST YOU A PENNY – I PROMISE!   Kiva will notify me if any of my readers take up a Free Trial, but I’d love you to still let me know in the Comment section, below.

TOGETHER, LET’S TRY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE THIS MONTH!

CBBH Blog Hop

So that´s the CBBH Photo Challenge for MAY, everyone!

Remember, all you have to do is post your entry by the end of the month, tag your entry ‘CBBH Photo Challenge’,  link back to this blog and, most importantlydon´t forget to add links to any two blogs that you´ve commented on during the past month, so that we can all HOP OVER and have a look.  Make sure you FOLLOW THIS BLOG so you don´t miss next month´s exciting challenge!

For more information on how the CBBH Photo Challenge works click here.

I hope everyone taking part enjoys the exposure the CBBH Photo Challenge offers to featured blogs and, who knows, you may end up finding a new favourite!  I´m looking forward to seeing your interpretations.

[CBBH logo Image credit: (cc) Mostly Dans]