Travel Theme: Multiples

Looking down from Còmpeta church tower

 

Looking down from the tower of Còmpeta’s church at the many umbrellas shading customers at the bars and restaurants in Plaza Almijara.

This is my response to Travel Theme: Multiples

 

More photo challenges you might enjoy:

CBBH Photo Challenge: REFLECTION

Sunday Post: GOALS

Weekly Image of Life: WISHES FOR 2013

 

Menú del Día: Great food at a budget price

Pinchitos at Ferrara Asador, Torrox Costa

For much less than the cost of an evening dinner, most restaurants in La Axarquía have a cheap, fixed-price meal available at lunchtime only.

Because the normal Spanish working day has a 3 hour break in the middle, many Spanish workers take advantage of this time (often referred to as a siesta) by catching up with friends or colleagues over lunch.

Why eat a sandwich at your desk when you can enjoy a leisurely lunch with friends?

Ferrara Asadaor, Torrox Costa, Spain

Roast pork at Ferrara Asador, Torrox Costa

Drinks and bread included

Known as Menu del Día, you can usually enjoy a two or three course meal, including bread and your first drink, for around 8 – 10 euros.  It´s usually a set menu, though there is often a choice of three or four dishes for each course.

A typical menu might include soup or salad to start, followed by fish or pork with flan or coffee to finish.  Bread, plus your choice of first drink (beer, wine or water) are usually included in the price.

Typical board advertising Menu of the Day, Spain

Look out for a board outside the restaurant, advertising the Menu del Día, which will usually be written in Spanish, and always remember to look out for restaurants and bars frequented by locals rather than tourists.

My choice in Torrox Costa:

** Ferrara Asador on the N340, near to the Repsol garage.  At only €8 with great service, good choice and quality of food, it´s well worth a visit, but go before 2.00pm as it gets very busy, especially in August.

** Fancy something a bit different ?  Try the Jing Chinese restaurant on the Paseo Maritimo along Ferrara Beach.  Their menu del día is even cheaper at €6, but drinks cost extra.  Again, excellent food and service.

Where´s your favourite place to eat, east of Málaga?

Love food?  You might like to drool over these posts:

Slice of Life:  Spanish bars

Let´s talk about tapas!

Fresh Figs Stuffed with Goat´s Cheese and wrapped in Smoked Bacon

Patatas a lo pobre: Poor man´s potatoes

Patatas a lo pobre is a classic Andalucían dish that can be served either as tapas, or to accompany a wide variety of fish and chicken dishes.

I have my own version that I sometimes cook in the microwave, using less olive oil than in the traditional way of cooking in a frying pan.  It is just as delicious!

Ingredients (adjust according to taste/numbers):

Potatoes, sliced

Onions, sliced

Garlic, chopped

Green peppers (Italian), sliced

Red pepper, sliced  (I just add a small amount for the colour)

Salt and pepper

Mixed herbs

Extra virgin Olive oil

Patatas a lo pobre - ingredients

Layer the ingredients into a glass Pyrex-type dish, drizzle with olive oil, cover with pierced cling-film and microwave on full power for approximately 20 minutes (or until potatoes are cooked).  I usually check about halfway through, give it a little mix around and add more olive oil if I feel I need to.

Que aproveche!

Have you ever tried cooking tapas, at home?

You might also enjoy these posts too:

Fresh Figs Stuffed with Goat´s Cheese and wrapped in Smoked Bacon

Let’s talk about tapas!

All at sea with the Virgen del Carmen

Slice of Life: Spanish bars

A bar here in southern Spain is very different from a typical British pub.  Although layouts may vary, what you will usually find will be a bar counter, with tall seats around, often with a covered tapas display. This will likely be in two parts, one containing meats and tortillas ready to be heated up and served with your drink, the other with cold tapas and salads. Many bars still serve tapas at an inclusive price with the drink, whilst others serve rather more elaborate nibbles which are charged for individually.

typical tapas bar
One of the main differences with a British pub will be the size of drink. Normally if you ask for a beer (una cerveza) it will be in a smaller glass, either a “tubo” which is a tall tumbler or in a glass not dissimilar to a large wine glass. The only time you will see anyone with a “pint” glass, they will usually be a tourist on the coast.  You will be just as likely to see people at the bar drinking coffee (un café) or a glass of wine (una copa de vino).

Tables away from the bar counter, either inside or outside, are typical café tables with upright chairs, not lounge-type tables and chairs like in British pubs .

There is usually a large display of spirit bottles behind the bar and invariably a leg of Serrano ham on a carving frame.  You should try this typical Spanish  delicacy –  it´s delicious!

Almost everywhere,  customers take all their food and drink and only pay when they are ready to leave.  In busy big city bars, the tapas, usually more sophisticated, will each come with a small wooden skewer and, when you have finished, the barman will count the skewers and charge accordingly.

Tapas to choose

I would recommend you to visit as many bars and cafeterías as possible, especially away from the tourist haunts. Look for places full of Spaniards and litter, in the form of till receipts, on the floor signifying that you have found a good spot.

Some bars, especially on the coast, offer more seafood, but try different ones and you will inevitably find a handful that will become part of your regular tapas trail.

Where´s your favourite Spanish bar?

If you like this article….try also looking here:

The heart of Cómpeta: El Paseo de las Tradiciones

Photographs I love …. and why!

A flowering snapshot of a January day

Slice of Life: Spanish bars

A bar here in southern Spain is very different from a typical British pub.  Although layouts may vary, what you will usually find will be a bar counter, with tall seats around, often with a covered tapas display. This will likely be in two parts, one containing meats and tortillas ready to be heated up and served with your drink, the other with cold tapas and salads. Many bars still serve tapas at an inclusive price with the drink, whilst others serve rather more elaborate nibbles which are charged for individually.

typical tapas bar
One of the main differences with a British pub will be the size of drink. Normally if you ask for a beer (una cerveza) it will be in a smaller glass, either a “tubo” which is a tall tumbler or in a glass not dissimilar to a large wine glass. The only time you will see anyone with a “pint” glass, they will usually be a tourist on the coast.  You will be just as likely to see people at the bar drinking coffee (un café) or a glass of wine (una copa de vino).

Tables away from the bar counter, either inside or outside, are typical café tables with upright chairs, not lounge-type tables and chairs like in British pubs .

There is usually a large display of spirit bottles behind the bar and invariably a leg of Serrano ham on a carving frame.  You should try this typical Spanish  delicacy –  it´s delicious!

Almost everywhere,  customers take all their food and drink and only pay when they are ready to leave.  In busy big city bars, the tapas, usually more sophisticated, will each come with a small wooden skewer and, when you have finished, the barman will count the skewers and charge accordingly.

Tapas to choose

I would recommend you to visit as many bars and cafeterías as possible, especially away from the tourist haunts. Look for places full of Spaniards and litter, in the form of till receipts, on the floor signifying that you have found a good spot.

Some bars, especially on the coast, offer more seafood, but try different ones and you will inevitably find a handful that will become part of your regular tapas trail.

Where´s your favourite Spanish bar?

 

If you like this article….try also looking here:

The heart of Cómpeta: El Paseo de las Tradiciones

Photographs I love …. and why!

A flowering snapshot of a January day