Malaga: the city that gives you Moore – Henry Moore!

Henry Moore sculpture, Malaga

The Fundación ‘la Caixa’ sponsored exhibition, “Henry Moore: Arte en la Calle” (Henry Moore: Art in the Street) has brought some of Moore’s monumental bronzes to Málaga.

Six of British Surrealist artist, Henry Moore‘s bronze sculptures can be seen on Calle Alcazabilla, in the midst of some of Málaga’s most popular tourist attractions, near to the Alcazaba fortress, the Roman amphitheatre and the old Customs House.

 

Henry Moore sculpture, Malaga

It’s a joy to see these modern pieces against such a historical background.

You only have another two weeks (until June 28th) to view the sculptures in Málaga, before the exhibition moves to other Spanish cities including Santander, Burgos and Pamplona.

Henry Moore sculpture, Malaga

Henry Moore sculpture, Malaga

Henry Moore sculpture, Malaga

Henry Moore would have been delighted that his sculptures are displayed on the streets of Málaga, as he once famously stated: “Sculpture is an art of the open air. I would rather have a piece of my sculpture put in a landscape, almost any landscape, than in, or on, the most beautiful building I know.”

Which is YOUR favourite?

Centre Pompidou – Málaga’s newest artistic masterpiece

Entrance to the Centre Pompidou, Malaga

Málaga is leading the way with a new concept dubbed the “Pop-up Pompidou”, where the general public is offered a selection of around 90 masterpieces from the famous Centre Pompidou’s collection.

Becoming the first outside of France, the Centre Pompidou, Málaga will initially be a city feature for five years, but with an option to extend for a further five years.

The museum also features a programme of exhibitions and workshops aimed at families and younger audiences, making today’s art accessible to the widest possible audience.

Centre Pompidou, Malaga - inside out

We’ve become used to seeing the steel and glass cube (El Cubo) at one end of Muelle Uno (Quay 1), Málaga’s new port and shopping area. What was unclear until now, was that this cube was really a skylight, casting it’s sunlit magic into what has now become the cavernous museum below.

New-look Pompidou Centre, Malaga

Sporting a new look, El Cubo has itself become a piece of art, adorned with coloured panels by artist Daniel Buren, entitled “Incubé”.

I was fortunate to be one of the first people to visit the new Centre Pompidou, Málaga during it’s opening weekend, at the end of March 2015.

Entrance to the Centre Pompidou, Malaga

After entering the Centre Pompidou, the stairs lead you down to the surprisingly large exhibition space inside, where you are taken on a journey through “The Collection”, featuring art of the 20th and 21st centuries.

The works on “human representation” are divided into five galleries, some larger and some smaller, exploring such themes as “Metamophoses”, “Self-Portraits”, “The Man without a Face”, “The Political Body” and “The Body in Pieces”.

Within each gallery the art is represented in the form of sculptures, paintings, installations, films and videos.

Displayed on the walls through the museum are works by Pablo Picasso, Frida Kahlo, Georg Baselitz, Joan Miró, Francis Bacon, Antoni Tàpies, Max Ernst, Marc Chagall, Constantin Brancusi and many others.

Ghost by Kader Attia at Centre Pompidou, Malaga

Centre Pompidou, Malaga

Without a doubt, my favourite piece was within the “The Body in Pieces” gallery, by Algerian artist, Kader Attia. “Ghost” is an installation of more than 140 hollow figures, kneeling in straight rows and all facing in the same direction. Each empty figure is made entirely of aluminum foil and alludes to be an anonymous Middle Eastern woman, covered from head to toe by her chador, bowed in prayer.

Ghost by Kader Attia at Centre Pompidou, Malaga

These fragile forms convey a powerful statement.

The installation could be described as vaguely sinister, yet I felt myself both respecting the figures’ privacy of worship, as well as being curiously drawn to inspect the hollow shells further.

 Interactive art at Centre Pompidou, Malaga

I was able to seize the opportunity to become part of two of the interactive exhibits – the first, unknowingly, as I queued with the crowd outside the entrance to the museum, where the moving image is displayed on a wall inside, as a piece of art.

Hidden Faces at Centre Pompidou, Malaga

Later, in “The Man Without A Face” gallery I was encouraged to become an “anonymous witness” by hiding behind a white mask to observe how other visitors react to the artworks (and to me hiding behind the mask!)

Two or three temporary exhibitions are scheduled each year at the Centre Pompidou, Málaga. There is a cafe, auditorium and children’s inter-active play area.

Leaflets are available at the entrance (in several languages, including Spanish and English) suggesting various self-guided routes through the exhibits, depending on the amount of time you have available.

OPENING HOURS:

16th June to 15th September: 11.00am to 10.00pm
16th September to 15th June: 9.30am to 8.00pm

Closed on Tuesdays, January 1st and December 25th.

ENTRY FEES:

Permanent collection: €7, concessions €4
Temporary exhibition: €4, concessions €2.50
Permanent collection + temporary exhibition: €9, concessions €5.50

MY INSIDER TIP: FREE ENTRY after 4pm every Sunday 

WEBSITE: centrepompidou-malaga.es

Malaga: Orange Blossom, Incense and Art

Orange blossom in Andalucia

It’s an exciting time to be in Málaga.

To add to the heavenly scent of the orange blossom (also known as “azahar”), this weekend sees the beginning of Holy Week – with incense wafting into the heady mix.

Easter week in Malaga, Spain

Easter week in Malaga, Spain

Easter week in Malaga, Spain

Semana Santa features seven days of religious passion and spectacle – not only in Málaga city, of course, but in every town and small village throughout Andalucía.

Plus, one of Málaga’s famous sons returns each year to take part –YES, ladies, Antonio Banderas is in town!

Málaga already has a well established art scene with its Picasso museum, Contemporary Art Centre and Baroness Carmen Thyssen museum, but this week has seen the city’s credentials as an Art Hub extending further, with the opening of the Russian State Art Museum from St. Petersburg.

The Russian museum is housed in the beautifully restored Tobacco factory (Tabacalera) to the west of the city centre, near to the already popular Automobile Museum.

And today, Málaga extends it’s cultural connections still further, with the opening of the Málaga branch of the Pompidou Centre – the first outside of France.

Dubbed the Pop-Up Pompidou, the museum is housed underneath El Cubo, a huge glass cube in Muelle Uno – the city’s fabulous port area.

Which museum will YOU visit first?

 

Málaga’s Urban Street Art

Street Art in Malaga by ROA  - Málaga Arte Urbano en el SoHo (MAUS)

There’s something fabulous happening in Málaga – stunning street art – and I’m not talking about graffiti.

Málaga Arte Urbano en el Soho” (otherwise known as MAUS) has invited international urban street artists to create fabulous pieces of art on the walls around Málaga’s “Barrio de las Artes“, the bohemian Soho district.

Artists include Dadi Dreucol, the Madrid-based Boa Mistura collective, José Medina Galeote,  Andi Rivas and my personal favourite, ROA, who is responsible for the amazing chameleon above.

There are many more images than I can display here, so if you want to have a look for yourself, head to the Soho district of Málaga, situated on the port side of the Alameda Principal and east of the River Guadalmedina.

Whilst you’re there, you might also want to also look into the Contemporary Art Centre by the river, which is free of charge and well worth an hour of your time.

Chameleon by ROA in Malaga, Spain

What’s your opinion about street art?  Which is your favourite photo?

Do let me know in the comment section, and if you like this post, feel free to share it using the social media buttons below.

 

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Travel Theme: Art

View of Cómpeta from the Mirador

Village of Cómpeta through the Mirador

 

Here is the view of the mountain village of Cómpeta taken from (and through) the Mirador.  The village is situated at 638 metres above sea level in the foothills of La Maroma (the highest peak of the Sierra Tejeda).

The Mirador panorámico (look-out point) is a Gaudi-esque balcony, marking the entrance to the village, and a place to marvel at the sight of the white village tumbling down the hillside overshadowed by the majestic backdrop of Monte Maroma.

This post is my response to the Travel Theme photo challenge – Art


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