10 interesting facts about Málaga’s new Ferris wheel

As if the city isn’t exciting enough, Málaga has a new attraction on it’s skyline – a giant observation wheel.  The giant ferris wheel is located at the entrance to the port, parallel to Muelle de Heredia.

Here are ten facts about the ride you probably don’t know, but might be interested to find out:

Malaga's new ferris wheel

1.   La Noria de Málaga (as it will be known) stands 70 metres tall – that’s just short of 230 feet.

2.   Weighing in at 600 tons, the Mirador Princess ferris wheel is Europe’s largest transportable attraction – yes, it’s moveable!

3.   There are 42 air-conditioned cabins, each accommodating up to eight people.

4.   Each cabin offers 360 degree panoramic views across the city, port and Mediterranean Sea and, on a clear day, vistas of up to 30 kilometres.

Cabins on Malaga's Ferris wheel

5.   Maximum capacity is 1000 visitors per hour.

6.   An operating licence has been granted for an initial period of eight months.

7.   The wheel is LED illuminated, offering a stunning after-dark show.

8.   La Noria de Málaga is suitable for disabled passengers

Malaga's new ferris wheel at Muelle de Heredia

9.    A full turn of the wheel takes four minutes.

10.  It takes 25 special trailers to transport the wheel between sites, and 25 men working for two weeks to put it together on arrival, with a little help from a 300 ton crane.

 

If you’re inspired to ride on La Noria de Málaga, the observation wheel is open daily from 11am to 11pm (1am at weekends).

 

While you’re here, you might also be interested in:

My detailed “Cost of Living in Málaga” report

Jurassic Park: Andalucían style

 

Malaga hosts the Spanish cycle race – La Vuelta

Riders in La Vuelta, Spain

Málaga province has been experiencing the passion, emotion and excitement of La Vuelta a España (the Spanish equivalent of the Tour de France) during the first four days of the famous cycle race, before it moves on to other parts of Spain.

The time trials began last Saturday in Marbella, before the race pushed off with Stage 2 from Alhaurin de la Torre, finishing the day at the world’s most infamous walkway, the Caminito del Rey.

Stage 3 brought La Vuelta riders to the east of Málaga, yesterday, through spectacular mountains before heading down to the coast and turning west towards the finishing line in Málaga city.

Road closures meant spectators being in position more than an hour before the riders came through, but fold-up chairs, beach umbrellas offering shade from the hot sun and a cool-box full of cold drinks made the wait all the more pleasant.

Looking towards Torre del Mar

Having decided to watch the race pass by at the start of the sprint section, just west of Torre del Mar, we were hoping to catch a glimpse of Tour de France winner, Chris Froome, riding for Team Sky.

We had stunning views of the mountains and the road back towards Torre del Mar.

First sight of La Vuelta riders

Soon enough, motorcycle outriders started appearing and roaring past, first one then another. Surely they must be coming by now? The time of the riders’ scheduled arrival came and went, when suddenly, a helicopter appeared.

They’re here!

The first six riders sprint towards Malaga

The leading group consisted of just six riders and the few people standing outside the Go Karting track on the N340a near to Almayate, started waving chequered flags, clapping and cheering.

Only just over a minute later came the main body of cyclists known as “the peloton”.

Would I be able to spot Chris Froome?

HAwatch my video and have a guess!! (HINT: it takes 50 seconds)

The support vehicles follow closely behind

The peloton streamed by and, it was all over in moments.

Following closely behind were the many support vehicles vying for position and pipping their horns.  At one stage, I thought I might end up filming a pile-up of vehicles!

All that was left was to collect the water bottles that had been discarded by the riders as they passed.

Did you notice one come whizzing my way (at 11 seconds) during the video? Yes, it hit me on the ankle!

Discarded water bottles from La Vuelta riders

Anyone want a used water bottle?

Torrox: Let me take you to Funky Town

Umbrellas in Torrox pueblo

You might not think of one of Andalucía’s famous white villages as being “FUNKY”, and neither did I, until yesterday morning when I went into Plaza de la Constitución in Torrox pueblo on an errand.

WOW! THAT’S PRETTY FUNKY!

A passing plane as seen through the Torrox umbrellas

Shadows from the umbrellas in Torrox, Andalucia

There are hundreds of umbrellas, in six different colours, hanging from discreet wires all around the square.

WHY?

To give much needed shade, as well as making the town (even more) attractive to visitors!

Amused by the Torrox umbrellas

Multi-coloured umbrellas in Torrox pueblo, Andalucia, Spain

They certain made ME smile :)

How cool/funky/quirky is this, huh?  Let me know what YOU think ….

Baños de Vilo: The Incredible Moorish Baths at Periana

Around three kilometres from the village of Periana is the old Moorish pool in the little hamlet of Baños de Vilo (Baths of Vilo).

During the 18th and 19th centuries this pool was considered one of the most important in Andalucía, so much so that in 1892 its waters were declared “medicinal mineral”. The magnesium, calcium and nitrogen found within the waters offered healing and therapeutic properties to those with skin complaints, and people flocked for miles around to bathe in the sulphurous-smelling pool.

Despite it’s popularity, there was much squabbling over ownership of the pool and even though some improvements were made, the facility was wrecked in 1907 when a huge storm ripped through it. Subsequently, the baths fell into disrepair.

The Town Hall (Ayuntamiento) of Periana acquired the property in the 1990s and restoration work began to recover the Baños de Vilo for tourism purposes.

Where to find Los Baños de Vilo:

Soon after you leave the village of Periana, heading north-west on the A7204, there is a split in the road. Stay on the A7204 towards Riogordo and Colmenar. A few hundred metres after the 10km road marking, look out for a tiled sign on the right-hand side of the road.   Turn here and after about 100 metres you will cross a narrow bridge over the river Vilo.

Continue up the road for a further two hundred metres, until you see a sign on a white wall on the left. I parked my car here.

It isn’t obvious where to go, but you should head through the large iron double gates into a patio area, which looks like you are going into someone’s garden – but you’re not!

Ahead of you to the right is a path covered with flowers growing over an archway. Walk through the flowering arch and you will see a little stone bridge leading you across the river, with a small construction of walls and a stone tower on the far side.

Here you will see the turquoise water shimmering in the sunlight and you’ll probably also notice the smell of the sulphur, normally associated with natural thermal pools.

Here’s a cool video of Los Baños de Vilo

It’s time to roll your trousers up!

Once in a Blue Moon

Blue Moon over the Axarquia, Spain We all know that the phrase “once in a blue moon” means “rarely”, but do you know what a Blue Moon really is?

CLUE: It has nothing to do with it being the colour blue, although the Moon can develop a bluish tone caused by excessive dust particles in the atmosphere (such as when Mount St Helens erupted in 1980).

Well, the modern-day definition of Blue Moon refers to the second full Moon in a calendar month with two full moons.

The last Blue Moon was on 31st August 2012 but you’ll only have to wait another couple of days until the next one, this Friday (31st July 2015). Make the most of it though, as the one after won’t come along until 31st January 2018!

In the meantime, I’ll leave you with Frank Sinatra singing “Blue Moon”, of course!

Whilst you’re here, you might also enjoy:

Searching the Night Sky for the International Space Station

Malaga’s Sensational Phoenician Moon Goddess