Malaga: Orange Blossom, Incense and Art

Orange blossom in Andalucia

It’s an exciting time to be in Málaga.

To add to the heavenly scent of the orange blossom (also known as “azahar”), this weekend sees the beginning of Holy Week - with incense wafting into the heady mix.

Easter week in Malaga, Spain

Easter week in Malaga, Spain

Easter week in Malaga, Spain

Semana Santa features seven days of religious passion and spectacle – not only in Málaga city, of course, but in every town and small village throughout Andalucía.

Plus, one of Málaga’s famous sons returns each year to take part -YES, ladies, Antonio Banderas is in town!

Málaga already has a well established art scene with its Picasso museum, Contemporary Art Centre and Baroness Carmen Thyssen museum, but this week has seen the city’s credentials as an Art Hub extending further, with the opening of the Russian State Art Museum from St. Petersburg.

The Russian museum is housed in the beautifully restored Tobacco factory (Tabacalera) to the west of the city centre, near to the already popular Automobile Museum.

And today, Málaga extends it’s cultural connections still further, with the opening of the Málaga branch of the Pompidou Centre – the first outside of France.

Dubbed the Pop-Up Pompidou, the museum is housed within Le Cube in the fabulous Muelle Uno – the city’s fabulous port area.

Which museum will YOU visit first?

 

Torre del Mar: The Sun has Got His Hat On!

We’ve had a lot of cloud and rain during the past week.  Fortunately, Mr. Sunshine is never too far away, so this morning when he popped through the clouds, I hot-footed it down to Torre del Mar for a walk along the promenade.  

Banana flower - Torre del Mar

There is a lovely paved promenade at Torre del Mar, with beautiful gardens running alongside, and I’d only been walking for a few minutes when I came across this stunning flower on a banana plant.

Isn’t it magnificent? 

Boat club - Torre del Mar

A little further on, as I approached the Sailing Club, I moved from the paved promenade onto the hard, compacted sandy path on the beach, for a better view of the many boats stored at the club.

(You can see the clouds still threatening, over the mountains in the distance and indeed, as I write this, the rain has returned).

Sandy path near the boat club, Torre del Mar

Known as the Sendero Litoral, this sandy path runs from the Rio Vélez delta to the port at Caleta de Vélez  – a distance of 3.4 kilometres, and is popular with walkers and joggers.

Sandy path near the boat club, Torre del Mar

Do YOU have a favourite place where you love to walk when you get the chance?

 

Shining Brightly: Malaga’s Christmas Lights

 Malaga's gothic Christmas lights  2014

During the festive season, the Christmas Lights in Málaga are always a great place to visit, but this year they have really surpassed themselves.

They are nothing short of spectacular!

Each evening, Calle Marqués de Larios, the main pedestrianised shopping street is crowded with people enjoying a party atmosphere with balloons and street performers to entertain them. What I particularly love here in the city, as in every village and town across Spain, you will see all the family generations out taking their evening stroll together.

Whilst they are still open, the shops, as well as the bars and restaurants are brimming over with people either doing their Christmas shopping or just soaking up the festive atmosphere.

Malaga's gothic Christmas lights  2014

Detail of Malaga's gothic Christmas lights  2014

The stars of this particular light show are shining brightly on Calle Marqués de Larios (famous for being paved with marble), and this year’s display has a Gothic feel, with a cathedral-arched frame dominating the street.  

Most surrounding streets have a more modest display of lights too, so have a wander around and see them, but don’t forget to look up at the beautiful buildings, too.

You’ll see bright red poinsettias everywhere – planted on the roundabouts, hanging from lamp posts and displayed in huge cones around Calle Larios.

There’s a huge choice of bars and restaurants to tempt you – many with their gas-flame heaters burning outside to keep you warm.  If you have to drive back home again later, you might prefer to try the best chocolate and churros in Málaga, at Cafe Aranda in Calle Santos.  The light, crispy churros and thick, creamy hot chocolate to dip them in are absolutely scrumptious!

Afterwards, wander down Calle Larios to the main road through the centre, Alameda Principal, to see the beautifully lit trees and the flower stalls or turn left and walk along the edge of the Paseo del Parque to enjoy the many Christmas stalls lining the route.

Xmas lights 2

Marvel at the huge Christmas tree in Plaza Constitución, with the Gothic arches peeping at you from Calle Marqués de Larios, inviting you to come closer.

Malaga's gothic Christmas lights 2014

Malaga's Christmas lights 2014

It’s easy to be fooled by the blue skies and warm sunshine, but yes, it’s only two weeks until Christmas Day.

You can really get in the mood for Christmas by visiting the outdoor skating rink in front of El Corte Ingles, or go to see one of the many the Bélens (crib and Nativity scenes) around the city – of which the best (in my opinion) is in the Town Hall.

Malaga’s Christmas lights shine from 6.30pm – 2am daily, until 6th January 2015

 

What’s YOUR favourite thing to do or visit at Christmas?

 

Málaga Feria: They’ll be Dancing in the Street

Fireworks to start the Malaga feria

Fireworks to start the Malaga feria  [Image credit: Manolo Gómez Flickr CC]

Even the smallest village here in Andalucía has it’s own fiesta or feria, but today sees the final day of the BIGGEST PARTY OF ALL (well, around these parts at least) – the Málaga Feria!   

Held every year during August to commemorate the reclaiming of the city from the Moors by the Catholic Monarchs (Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon) on 18th August 1487, the Málaga feria is one of the largest fairs in Spain with millions of people joining the fun throughout the week.

Many daytime activities take place on the main shopping street - Calle Marques de Larios, Picasso’s birth-place – Plaza de la Merced and throughout the historic centre of the city from noon until  around 8pm each day.  There are open-air bars to tempt passers-by with sherry, delicious sweet Málaga wine and tapas while the sound of music fills the air.

Many people dress in traditional costume and spontaneous demonstrations of flamenco dancing often break out in the street.  

Yesterday, it was a joy to wander around the city, soaking up the party atmosphere before heading to the Bodega Bar El Pimpi for a spot of lunch.  El Pimpi seems to get bigger and bigger every time I go, with it’s warren of rooms and outdoor terraces, which were all packed with feria-goers.  The inside walls of the bar are decorated with photographs of famous visitors and historic posters of ferias past.  You can also see the enormous barrels signed by some celebrity patrons including former UK prime minister, Tony Blair and, one of Málaga’s famous sons, film-actor Antonio Banderas.

Tradition then dictates a short siesta before heading to the outskirts of the city (next to the Palacio de Congresos building, near the airport) for La Feria de la Noche (the night fair), which starts very slowly around ten in the evening and continues all night, until the break of dawn.

Here you will find hundreds of marquees (known as casetas) scattered throughout the fairground where you can enjoy more drinks and food, whilst dancing to the sound of both modern and flamenco music.

And, if like me, you LOVE fairground rides, then you can be flung here, there and everywhere on some wild, mechanical rides or take a gentle journey on the huge ferris wheel, for great views across the feria.

There are shuttle buses throughout the night from city centre to the fairground.

 Would you like to join in the party next year?